Tesla Pickup Unveil

I would be willing to bet, it is because you have the muscle memory for it. I highly doubt there have been any studies on the effect of single peddle with regards to safety for younger drivers. Based on having seen how people react with accidents, does not give me much confidence. I hope you know why, people are not taught to drive with the accelerator with the right foot and the brake with the left? (Yes, racing, and specialized defensive driving schools teach it, I am talking for the average driver). People push both pedals when they want to emergency stop. With single pedal, they have no muscle memory to move off the accelerator in an emergency.

Tim
It works exactly like how a gas car works, with the exception that you slow faster when you lift the “accelerator” pedal. What is there to get confused about?

There’s also the automated system that emergency brakes for you based on data from the cameras and lidar. That system will also steer to avoid a collision. I’ve never allowed it to do it for me, but I’d bet it works well enough to more than compensate for the problem you are imagining.
 
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It works exactly like how a gas car works, with the exception that you slow faster when you lift the “accelerator” pedal.
A good analogy would be driving around in 1st or second gear in a gas car.
 
has anyone ever engaged the clutch.... when driving an automatic?

fortunately, no one was behind us when "my friend" did that...
 
Bit of a “mea culpa”*…

In normal driving, one very rarely needs to use the brake pedal at all. I think one may develop an aversion to actually using the brake pedal to stop. At least I have.

In our hit-and-run from a couple years ago posted previously, I think that aversion led to me allowing our Tesla to coast just beyond the stop line for the intersection.


So, I can see how a bad habit can develop.

*In this particular case, I think our car’s position just beyond the stop line minimized damage from the collision. Dumb luck, but if we had been holding before the stop line, the impact would have been to our left front corner, not a sideswipe of the left rear door, potentially causing a lot more damage, and possibly injury, from a frontal impact. In any case, if you followed that thread, the side cameras footage gave is the offender’s tag, and he was subsequently charged and convicted of leaving the scene.
 
On a Tesla, the one-pedal braking is a nice, conservative, comfortable deceleration. With more spirited driving the brake pedal would be used regularly. You also have to use the brake pedal when putting the car in gear and putting it back into Park, so you won't forget where it is.
 
Just out of curiosity, have you driven a Tesla and used regen braking? Or are your concerns based on what you imagine it might be like?

Yes, Both brothers have Teslas (An X and Y model). Parents have a Mach-E, older brother has previously had Leafs and Bolts dating back to 2011. For us, it has always been about ditching the gas station. I rented a BMW M50 EV for three weeks in Tahoe this year, and I have rented multiple other EVs for one or two days on short trips.
I still detest single pedal. I also still believe, it is an accident waiting to happen.

Tim
 
It works exactly like how a gas car works, with the exception that you slow faster when you lift the “accelerator” pedal. What is there to get confused about?

There’s also the automated system that emergency brakes for you based on data from the cameras and lidar. That system will also steer to avoid a collision. I’ve never allowed it to do it for me, but I’d bet it works well enough to more than compensate for the problem you are imagining.

No it does not work the same. You let off the gas pedal and the engine still provides minimal additional force allowing you to effectively coast significantly further, and the car will never stop until it runs out of gas or goes up a steep enough hill. With single pedal, the car is actively deaccelerating the car when you release the accelerator pedal and will bring the car to a stop. This allows the driver in normal situations to never need to touch the brake pedal.

This effectively means the driver has no muscle memory in an emergency situation to press the brake.

Therefore, you are looking at emergency brake assist to compensate for a user experience failure. e.g. you are trying to use technology address a problem that technology has created. This is just bad design.

Tim
 
I don’t like single pedal. There’s the argument that VW uses that in most cases, coasting with light regen will put more charge in the batt over hard regen. I’m no engineer so I can’t dispute that claim. I just prefer to coast and it’s better for preventing brake corrosion. Of course one pedal saves on pads and rotors though.
 
It's just another way. There's nothing inherently unsafe about it. JMO.

Personally, I love it for commuting. Would turn it off when driving sporty.
 
visualize what the left foot does when attempting to engage the clutch....
Do you mean disengage? The clutch is engaged whenever your foot is off of the pedal. I've never done it while actually driving, but I have stomped an imaginary 3rd pedal when going to start an automatic car after having driven a manual for a while.
 
Do you mean disengage? The clutch is engaged whenever your foot is off of the pedal. I've never done it while actually driving, but I have stomped an imaginary 3rd pedal when going to start an automatic car after having driven a manual for a while.

I think he's referring to someone accidentally stomping on the brake pedal with their left foot, confusing it with for a (non-existent) clutch pedal.
 
Do you mean disengage? The clutch is engaged whenever your foot is off of the pedal. I've never done it while actually driving, but I have stomped an imaginary 3rd pedal when going to start an automatic car after having driven a manual for a while.

Yulp, I've been guilty of reaching for the shifter in my automatic to take it out of gear before starting while searching for the third pedal.

I also have an older VW Beetle and getting in it after driving my 5 speed Ranger found me sometimes reaching to put that 4 speed VW into 5th gear ...
 
No it does not work the same. You let off the gas pedal and the engine still provides minimal additional force allowing you to effectively coast significantly further, and the car will never stop until it runs out of gas or goes up a steep enough hill. With single pedal, the car is actively deaccelerating the car when you release the accelerator pedal and will bring the car to a stop. This allows the driver in normal situations to never need to touch the brake pedal.

This effectively means the driver has no muscle memory in an emergency situation to press the brake.

Therefore, you are looking at emergency brake assist to compensate for a user experience failure. e.g. you are trying to use technology address a problem that technology has created. This is just bad design.

Tim
Echoing another poster.

Have you personally driven single pedal for any length of time to develop the required muscle memory, not just renting on a weekend once in awhile?

Even on a single pedal vehicle, the brake is regularly used unless your right foot game is so good you can estimate your halt point at every stop line from long and varying distances out.
 
Even on a single pedal vehicle, the brake is regularly used unless your right foot game is so good you can estimate your halt point at every stop line from long and varying distances out.

When I first got my model 3, the regen braking took a bit of learning. I tended to let off a bit early and come up short. Now it's just reflexive. Coast to the halt point, then tap on the brake to stop the roll if necessary.

I drive 3 vehicles, one of which is an EV. Zero adjustment needed when moving between.

Some things get over analyzed.
 
Do you mean disengage? The clutch is engaged whenever your foot is off of the pedal. I've never done it while actually driving, but I have stomped an imaginary 3rd pedal when going to start an automatic car after having driven a manual for a while.

yup - disengage the clutch by pressing the clutch pedal.

"my friend" had been driving his standard for several years ....
 
I have stomped an imaginary 3rd pedal when going to start an automatic car after having driven a manual for a while.
Done that a few times.

Also done a few times while driving and talking on the phone (hands free) I have reached for that shift knob that wasn't there...
 
Echoing another poster.

Have you personally driven single pedal for any length of time to develop the required muscle memory, not just renting on a weekend once in awhile?

Even on a single pedal vehicle, the brake is regularly used unless your right foot game is so good you can estimate your halt point at every stop line from long and varying distances out.

Three week rental on vacation. And this was after I have driven a single pedal EV a lot.

Giving examples of people who have driven for years, and have the primacy of learning to drive with a dedicated brake pedal, does not apply.
You already have in this thread the example of someone used to a stick shift hitting the brake instead of a clutch. Fundamentally, driving is very much about "muscle memory".

I am not concerned about us old people on the forum who have decades of driving experience. My question is about the young people getting a license today in a vehicle that does not require a brake pedal.

Tim
 
a vehicle with no brake pedal. Although I don’t see the point.
IMG_0481.jpeg
 
Another one.

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Finally saw one. Flat green wrap. I guess they hadn't applied the stencil for the WM logo yet.
 
Something about this comic is familar...

can't quite put my finger on it...
 

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