Help me fill some space for a flight sim

Ozone

Pre-takeoff checklist
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Aug 10, 2014
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Ozone
My wife is giving me 1/2 a work table (the other 1/2 is for her cricut Machine). I tend to be an apple person, but I’m open to PC as well.
My goal is to run xplane-12 to practice IFR.

Here’s what I have so far (from outdated computer):
IMG_1230.jpeg
 
You’re off to a good start. Almost the same setup I have.

you don’t need much more on the desktop - maybe a shelf to hold the monitor and the monitor itself. Under the desk I recommend a hefty desktop class machine that exceeds the minimum specs.
 
I’m an Apple guy but Mac is not what you want for gaming both in terms of OS and computing grunt to price ratio. Build your own PC and you’ll save 30-40% off what you’ll pay for a pre-built. We built our gaming PC last year.

Also trackIR is a godsend. I haven’t been into flight sim since the late 2000s but even back then it was amazing. Can’t imagine how good it is now
 
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Well, it's Black Friday season, so good timing.
Yeah, if it's only IFR, then I wouldn't worry about a huge monitor or multi-screen setup. Spend the money on the graphics and processor.
For a data point, I'm running X-12 on an 11400 Intel, with an older GeForce GTX 1070 graphics card no problem. Vulkan really made it better for X-Plane IMO.
Also, I have the same rudder pedals. A suggestion is to calibrate the response sensitivity in X-plane for those.
Happy simming..
 
VR. :)

I did a custom configured HP OMni gaming amachine. Runs X-plne fill tilt smoothly. I just got the Honeycomb Alpha (yoke) and Brove (Throttle), and love them. I had the Logitech pedels. There is a guy on eBay that has replacement parts to make the more like light plane rudder pedals.

Running i9-10850K processor. Nvidia GeForce RTX-2080 Super. 32 GB ram, 2TB solid stage drive. About 3 years old, but still can handle flight sims. Also run DCS.
 
What’s the budget? I’d go no smaller than a 42” display. I’m running a 35” now and it’s just a bit too small for my taste and that’s using it primarily as a procedures trainer.

My XP12 panel is a near-exact analog of our plane with dual G5s, gauges laid out in the same manner, and the RSG GTN650. The honeycomb alpha yoke is nice, but what you’ve got will work just fine.

As long as your machine meets the min specs for XP12, it’ll be fine. I picked up a closeout desktop with as much ram as possible and a good video card that exceeded the XP12 specs for $799 from Costco about this time last year and it runs XP12 fine.
 
Running Alienware computer, have a G1000 emulator, Xplane 12, upgraded from Xplane 11, 55 inch display. Use it for IFR practice but it is not the same as true IFR. Took me a while to get rid of a lot of the bugs. Parts of the G1000 did not work, landings are very unrealistic, even the way the plane reacts to yoke, and rudder is unrealistic. I fly my T206H on it, and have despite trying to match the settings I use in my plane, cannot come close. The only thing it does for me is to get me used to the process of an IFR approach, but at the end of the day a desk top simulator is a poor substitution for real world experience. The only other thing it maybe helpful with is emergencies, however I have landed my simulator T206H in places where it would be impossible to do in real life, such as the Statue of Liberty, an air craft carrier, numerous roads, and bridges, and a school football field. So for the workflow for an emergency it is useful, but for the simulation of what landing would be like in an emergency situation not so much...all in all I find the simulator as fun but in my opinion not a substitute for training in the real world. It is interesting that my setup far exceeds many of the FAA approved setups for logging time, but because it is not purchased as such I am not able to log it as time. However, I am certain that I would not feel comfortable doing an IFR flight in true IMC based only on my time on a desk top simulator.
 

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Running Alienware computer, have a G1000 emulator, Xplane 12, upgraded from Xplane 11, 55 inch display. Use it for IFR practice but it is not the same as true IFR. Took me a while to get rid of a lot of the bugs. Parts of the G1000 did not work, landings are very unrealistic, even the way the plane reacts to yoke, and rudder is unrealistic. I fly my T206H on it, and have despite trying to match the settings I use in my plane, cannot come close. The only thing it does for me is to get me used to the process of an IFR approach, but at the end of the day a desk top simulator is a poor substitution for real world experience. The only other thing it maybe helpful with is emergencies, however I have landed my simulator T206H in places where it would be impossible to do in real life, such as the Statue of Liberty, an air craft carrier, numerous roads, and bridges, and a school football field. So for the workflow for an emergency it is useful, but for the simulation of what landing would be like in an emergency situation not so much...all in all I find the simulator as fun but in my opinion not a substitute for training in the real world. It is interesting that my setup far exceeds many of the FAA approved setups for logging time, but because it is not purchased as such I am not able to log it as time. However, I am certain that I would not feel comfortable doing an IFR flight in true IMC based only on my time on a desk top simulator.

My experience is the exact opposite. I have an FAA approved BATD (Redbird TD2) configured as a 172 with a G1000 and it flies nothing like my actual airplane (RV-10). However, I find the lack of flight characteristic commonality between the sim and my plane, with respect to IFR flight currency and proficiency, irrelevant. Plus here in Florida, good IMC days to go practice in are few and far between. Also, as the sim is much harder to hand fly than my real plane, I find actual IMC out in the NAS to be much easier in reality. YMMV.....
 
If you fly G1000 there are emulators for iPad that will talk to X-Plane. So you have a dedicated PFD and MFD. If you want to go really wild, they make a frame for the iPad that has the buttons and knobs that work.

If you don't do VR, I would go with one of the large curved monitors. The bigger the better. I am running dual 27s, but I got them before the switch to the new ones. Ultimate would be large curved center with two wing flat ones to be the side view. But may need a separate computer to drive them. This is why VR is nice.
 
these are great replies! It's also reassuring to know than min-spec machines do just fine. I think i will be going with an IBM type computer after looking at all the pros/cons. Plus, then I can use the same computer for the condor glider sim.

Any HD size recommendations? I am tempted to go for at least 1T.
 
Any HD size recommendations? I am tempted to go for at least 1T.
If you are assembling a PC then you can always add hard drive space at a later time if you're looking to save money now. But the difference between 1tb and 2 is about $50.
 
Why not get an approved simulator so you can log approaches? Money?
 
Why not get an approved simulator so you can log approaches? Money?
good question: the affordable redbird physics suck. I didnt want to spend $10k+ for a system (unless you have a better suggestion?).

Mostly i want to practice approaches and flow. I will save my money and use that to fly a real plane every 10 days or so. Also, I live in MN: a place where actual IFR conditions will simply kill you :cool:
 
good question: the affordable redbird physics suck. I didnt want to spend $10k+ for a system (unless you have a better suggestion?).

Mostly i want to practice approaches and flow. I will save my money and use that to fly a real plane every 10 days or so. Also, I live in MN: a place where actual IFR conditions will simply kill you :cool:

Not sure it’s better, have no personal experience, but “only” $5400:

 
IMG_8687.jpeg


My current setup, Logitech yoke, throttle quadrant, and rudders. Dark matter 49” 2k monitor on an AMD RX7900XTX gpu. Running Vatsim for human ATC and flight events to hook ForeFlight into MSFS.
 
these are great replies! It's also reassuring to know than min-spec machines do just fine. I think i will be going with an IBM type computer after looking at all the pros/cons. Plus, then I can use the same computer for the condor glider sim.

Any HD size recommendations? I am tempted to go for at least 1T.

These days for a desk top, 1T is sort of the start point. I put in a 2T solid state and 10T rotational.

My computer is a "build it yourself" HP Omni-GT13. Not really built myself, but custom specs. I normally assemble my own, but the prices did not favor that this time. It is only the 2nd computer I had purchased ready to run for my primary use since 1987. :D
 
Thanks, everyone, for the suggestions. My final configuration that I ordered:
1. AMD ryzen 7 CPU
2. Geforce 4070 GPU
3. 2T SSD
4. 2T HDD
5. 32Gb RAM


And, an on-sale 32" Acer curved monitor from costco (not as fancy as the 49" shown above, but should do mostly)

With all of this, should I transfer over my xplane 11 software key and planes, or simply switch to xplane 12?
 
…With all of this, should I transfer over my xplane 11 software key and planes, or simply switch to xplane 12?
Switch to 12 unless you’re heavily invested in XP11 payware.

For the 32” curved monitor, you may find this informative, though it has more to do with the ultra-wides.

 
Thanks, everyone, for the suggestions. My final configuration that I ordered:
1. AMD ryzen 7 CPU
2. Geforce 4070 GPU
3. 2T SSD
4. 2T HDD
5. 32Gb RAM


And, an on-sale 32" Acer curved monitor from costco (not as fancy as the 49" shown above, but should do mostly)

With all of this, should I transfer over my xplane 11 software key and planes, or simply switch to xplane 12?
I made the switch. Not sure it was worth it. It took me about a month of tweeking to get 12 to perform like 11. The issues were how the plane performed and some of the functionality of the g1000 simulator. The graphics are slightly better but not a big difference. Then again the upgrade is not that expensive and it's probably better supported.
 
VR. :)

I did a custom configured HP OMni gaming amachine. Runs X-plne fill tilt smoothly. I just got the Honeycomb Alpha (yoke) and Brove (Throttle), and love them. I had the Logitech pedels. There is a guy on eBay that has replacement parts to make the more like light plane rudder pedals.

Running i9-10850K processor. Nvidia GeForce RTX-2080 Super. 32 GB ram, 2TB solid stage drive. About 3 years old, but still can handle flight sims. Also run DCS.
What VR headset do you have? I have a 3060ti and 5600x3D, afraid to try out VR before upgrading my GPU
 
What VR headset do you have? I have a 3060ti and 5600x3D, afraid to try out VR before upgrading my GPU
I don't know about the Meta headsets, but any of the headsets running through SteamVR, OpenXR, or WMR can have the resolution adjusted so that you can keep at a targeted frame rate. Meaning that you don't have to always run at 100% of the headset's native resolution.
 
What VR headset do you have? I have a 3060ti and 5600x3D, afraid to try out VR before upgrading my GPU
I have an older GeForce 1070 and VR works fine with it, so I would guess yours would be fine.

It would be pretty fantastic to have a pure VR program that needed no computer, yoke, and so on... and actual dials you could spin for GPS units, etc.
Rudder pedals would be something to overcome, but I'd be fine without them in X-Plane.
 
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