Spin training

edessa

Pre-takeoff checklist
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edessa
On the way to CFI and did the required spin training endorsement a couple of weeks ago. Was a bit nervous and the first spin that my instructor demonstrated scared me a bit. Not that he did anything wrong just my reaction to the unknown. After that I completed 4 or 5 my self. Never felt nauseous. It started to become fun. Never went into a full developed spin. I have since decided to make spin training a part of my flight review.Screenshot 2023-10-08 at 16.52.37.png
 
Part of your flight review, or flight reviews you will give as an instructor?
 
Once you master basic spin recoveries, spice it up by recovering to a predetermined heading or outside reference point, after a predetermined number of spins.
 
I would think as a CFI you'd want experience with fully developed spins, just in case your student does something stupid, freezes on the controls, and it takes you longer than you expected to get the controls back. And spinning through 2 or more rotations before recovering is a different experience than recovering within the 1st rotation. Stuff happens, be prepared.

Plus the real reason, they are fun.

Of course, assuming the airplane is certified for this, your CFI has the experience, you are following proper procedures, sufficient altitude, aircraft W&B, etc.
 
I was in the middle of my instrument training and not really feeling up to another "under the hood" lesson. As such, I asked my instructor if he felt like doing a spin recovery lesson instead, to which he happily obliged. We were flying a 172. He demonstrated one, allowing it to develop into a full spin, allowing at least two or three full rotations before recovery. From there, we did five or six more, going so far as to exaggerate the spin. Rudder in the direction of the spin, back on the elevator, power in. Amazing how easily a 172 will recover. At the end of the lesson, my instructor and I were both a bit nauseous and both the AI and DG were worthless. The takeaway? A 172's spin characteristics are fairly benign and relatively easy to recover from. With that said, you do need a bit of room to do so. If one were to get too slow in the pattern and turn too tightly, it doesn't matter how easily an aircraft will recover. Low and slow, you are not recovering.
 
Same here. First spin was in instrument training doing unusual attitudes.
 
If one were to get too slow in the pattern and turn too tightly, it doesn't matter how easily an aircraft will recover. Low and slow, you are not recovering.
Not if you hold it long enough to fully develop, but if you make prompt Recovery of the incipient spin, it’s amazing how little altitude you need.
 
Never went into a full developed spin

Interesting. When I did mine we did multiple fully developed spins. Decathlon. 5 rotations, then recovered. The first one sucked. After that each one feels less 'scary'
 
... Amazing how easily a 172 will recover. ... A 172's spin characteristics are fairly benign and relatively easy to recover from. ...
True, and because of this the 172 doesn't make a great spin training airplane. It's hard to get it to spin, and when it does, it usually recovers as soon as the pro-spin control inputs are reduced - not even requiring going to neutral, let alone requiring proper spin recovery inputs. The 150/152 is better and more frequently used for spin training.
 

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True, and because of this the 172 doesn't make a great spin training airplane. It's hard to get it to spin, and when it does, it usually recovers as soon as the pro-spin control inputs are reduced - not even requiring going to neutral, let alone requiring proper spin recovery inputs. The 150/152 is better and more frequently used for spin training.
And a 152 still only requires 400 feet for a 1-turn spin.
 
Not if you hold it long enough to fully develop, but if you make prompt Recovery of the incipient spin, it’s amazing how little altitude you need.
An "out the bottom" incipient spin in the direction of bank, e.g., base to final, would be very difficult to recover from at low altitude, regardless of one's spin recovery skill.
 
An "out the bottom" incipient spin in the direction of bank, e.g., base to final, would be very difficult to recover from at low altitude, regardless of one's spin recovery skill.
Depends On the airplane and how “incipient” the spin is, I guess.
 
I did the UPRT program at Sean Tucker's school in King City, CA quite a few years ago. Loved it so much, I stuck around for some aerobatic training. If you think 1-3 turn "spins" are fun, try a fully developed inverted spin in a Pitts. The over-the-top entry to an inverted spin is a whole lotta fun!
 
The nausea/motion sickness usually happens to the person that doesn't have the stick in his hands.
 
I like doing spins. I asked my instructor to do spins early in my training (C-150) and he obliged with 3 turn spins in both directions. He himself could only do a spin in one direction because of his artificial leg, though I didn't realize that at the time. Told me not to do them solo (with a smile as he know doubt knew I would anyway).
 
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